Probably one of the most frequently asked questions we get!

The answer is “NO”!

As we ramp up for 2021, one would think (hope) that issues such as cross border transportation of cannabis products amongst States would become easier. While public sentiment for legalization of cannabis is high (no pun intended!), corrective legislation is lagging.

Yes, the MORE & SAFE Acts have been resoundingly passed by the U.S. House of Representatives, but progressing this legislation through the Senate is a slow, laborious process. Optimism reigns, but even if the laws are changed in 2021, implementation may take us into 2022. “Implementation” is a government euphemism for figuring out how to tax and regulate!

We saw this in Canada. First passage of legalization, then regulatory structure, then implementation. A rather streamlined process in Canada, it still took several months. Then there is Mexico. Once the Mexico Supreme Court struck down all prohibitions against marijuana, it granted an implementation “stay” (legal for delay) of 6 months, to allow the Government to formalize regulation and taxes. Then another 6 month stay. Then another. And most recently, yet another 4 month delay. So, though the process of legalization is imminent, and cause for celebration, the implementation “can” will, no doubt,  be kicked down the street for a while.

But people are anxious and the tendency is to want to get the carriage in front of the horse! So back to the original question!  The TSA is there to guide us and explain the current rules regarding transportation of cannabis products. The weird thing is that TSA has reverted to the 60’s in its approach and language. As if parsing its warnings in language like the “Hippy Dippy Weatherman,” makes it more relatable or understandable for us.  Unfortunately, all that accomplishes is continuation of the “stoner” image legitimate cannabis companies work so hard to shed. Example, directly from the TSA:

“We hear it’s National Brownie Day so we’re here to talk about something really sticky-icky-icky (ooh wee)… and we’re here to get it out in the open air. Hopefully this doesn’t post near 4:20, because we’re about to doobie down.”

Marijuana whether dank or schwag, it simply isn’t dope in your carry-on or checked bag. This includes cannabis products and CBD oil, which remain illegal under federal law, except for products that contain no more than 0.3% THC on a dry weight basis or that are @FDA approved.

Let’s be blunt…do you know what happens when we discover your stash? We don’t yell jack-pot but are required to refer your product to our local law enforcement officers. The LEOs may choose to cite, fine, or simply confiscate the grass. We leaf it up to these professionals to hash it out, and in this case it isn’t a joint effort.

We aren’t here to bring you down with too much information. We’re just infusing you with some Kush knowledge so you don’t end up making a chronically bad decision. Don’t let your next travel plans go up in smoke, reach out to our best buds at AskTSA on Facebook or Twitter. High five!”

If you can get through the silliness of its prose, TSA actually does answer the question as to why we are not able to provide you with samples! In practice, leaving a legal state with product may not pose any huge risk. Even if your stash is discovered – when it is turned over to Local Enforcement, you are in a legal state, so no harm, no foul.  Tricky part is when you land in a state that isn’t legal. Although incoming baggage is seldom checked, it is possible and could cause hassles for you. Those hassles for legal cannabis companies involve licensing risks. So, please understand that much as we might want to provide samples for you, we work long and hard to be in this industry, and simply will not risk our license and status by transporting samples.

But to quote Bob Dylan, “the times, they are a changing.”

Until that time,

Your friends at HighBridge Premium Cannabis

P.S. – For a blast from the past, take a look at some old clips of iconic comedian George Carlin, who made Al Sleet, the “Hippy Dippy Weatherman”, a household reference to the cannabis culture back in the 60’s.

And, from the same era, but more relevant today than ever, Bob Dylan’s music and poetry is still inspirational.